Christ's Birth--Luke 2:1-20 (NIV)
     In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to his own town to register.

     So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expecting a child. While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.

     And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, "Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger."

     Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying,
          "Glory to God in the highest,
                 and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests."

     When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, "Let's go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about."

     So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told.

The Fall of Man
Genesis 2:15-17 (NIV)
     The LORD God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it. And the LORD God commanded the man, "You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die."

Genesis 3:1-19 (NIV)
     Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the LORD God had made. He said to the woman, "Did God really say, `You must not eat from any tree in the garden'?"
     The woman said to the serpent, "We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden, but God did say, `You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die.'"
     "You will not surely die," the serpent said to the woman. "For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil."
     When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye, and also desirable for gaining wisdom, she took some and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it. Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.
     Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the LORD God among the trees of the garden. But the LORD God called to the man, "Where are you?"
     He answered, "I heard you in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid."
     And he said, "Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten from the tree that I commanded you not to eat from?"
     The man said, "The woman you put here with me--she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it."
     Then the LORD God said to the woman, "What is this you have done?" The woman said, "The serpent deceived me, and I ate."
     So the LORD God said to the serpent, "Because you have done this,
          "Cursed are you above all the livestock
               and all the wild animals!
          You will crawl on your belly
               and you will eat dust
               all the days of your life.
          And I will put enmity
               between you and the woman,
               and between your offspring and hers;
          he will crush your head,
               and you will strike his heel."
     To the woman he said,
          "I will greatly increase your pains in childbearing;
               with pain you will give birth to children.
          Your desire will be for your husband,
               and he will rule over you."
     To Adam he said, "Because you listened to your wife and ate from the tree about which I commanded you, `You must not eat of it,'
          "Cursed is the ground because of you;
               through painful toil you will eat of it all the days of your life.
          It will produce thorns and thistles for you,
               and you will eat the plants of the field.
          By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food
               until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken;
          for dust you are and to dust you will return."

Man's Condition
Romans 3:10 (NIV) -- There is no one righteous, not even one.
Romans 3:23 (NIV) -- For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.
Romans 6:23 (NIV) -- For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.
Isaiah 54:6 (NIV)-- All of us have become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous acts are like filthy rags; we all shrivel up like a leaf, and like the wind our sins sweep us away.

The Crucifixion--Mark 15:1-39 (NIV)
     Very early in the morning, the chief priests, with the elders, the teachers of the law and the whole Sanhedrin, reached a decision. They bound Jesus, led him away and handed him over to Pilate.
     "Are you the king of the Jews?" asked Pilate.
     "Yes, it is as you say," Jesus replied.
     The chief priests accused him of many things. So again Pilate asked him, "Aren't you going to answer? See how many things they are accusing you of."
     But Jesus still made no reply, and Pilate was amazed.
     Now it was the custom at the Feast to release a prisoner whom the people requested. A man called Barabbas was in prison with the insurrectionists who had committed murder in the uprising. The crowd came up and asked Pilate to do for them what he usually did.
     "Do you want me to release to you the king of the Jews?" asked Pilate, knowing it was out of envy that the chief priests had handed Jesus over to him. But the chief priests stirred up the crowd to have Pilate release Barabbas instead.
     "What shall I do, then, with the one you call the king of the Jews?" Pilate asked them.
     "Crucify him!" they shouted.
     "Why? What crime has he committed?" asked Pilate.
     But they shouted all the louder, "Crucify him!"
     Wanting to satisfy the crowd, Pilate released Barabbas to them. He had Jesus flogged, and handed him over to be crucified.
     The soldiers led Jesus away into the palace (that is, the Praetorium) and called together the whole company of soldiers. They put a purple robe on him, then twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on him. And they began to call out to him, "Hail, king of the Jews!" Again and again they struck him on the head with a staff and spit on him. Falling on their knees, they paid homage to him. And when they had mocked him, they took off the purple robe and put his own clothes on him. Then they led him out to crucify him.
     A certain man from Cyrene, Simon, the father of Alexander and Rufus, was passing by on his way in from the country, and they forced him to carry the cross. They brought Jesus to the place called Golgotha (which means The Place of the Skull). Then they offered him wine mixed with myrrh, but he did not take it. And they crucified him. Dividing up his clothes, they cast lots to see what each would get.
     It was the third hour when they crucified him. The written notice of the charge against him read: THE KING OF THE JEWS. They crucified two robbers with him, one on his right and one on his left. Those who passed by hurled insults at him, shaking their heads and saying, "So! You who are going to destroy the temple and build it in three days, come down from the cross and save yourself!"
     In the same way the chief priests and the teachers of the law mocked him among themselves. "He saved others," they said, "but he can't save himself! Let this Christ, this King of Israel, come down now from the cross, that we may see and believe." Those crucified with him also heaped insults on him.
     At the sixth hour darkness came over the whole land until the ninth hour. And at the ninth hour Jesus cried out in a loud voice, "Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?"--which means, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"
     When some of those standing near heard this, they said, "Listen, he's calling Elijah."
     One man ran, filled a sponge with wine vinegar, put it on a stick, and offered it to Jesus to drink. "Now leave him alone. Let's see if Elijah comes to take him down," he said.
     With a loud cry, Jesus breathed his last.
     The curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. And when the centurion, who stood there in front of Jesus, heard his cry and saw how he died, he said, "Surely this man was the Son of God!"

Scripture quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NIV) are from THE HOLY BIBLE: NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan Publishing House. All rights reserved.